Battlegrounds: The 9 States to Watch

Tracking the presidential race's closest contests in real time

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The polls have closed, and the networks have called the race for President Obama. More detail below.


Virginia Battleground Icon-300.jpg

12:40 a.m. EST: The networks have now called the state for the president: 50 percent for Obama to 49 percent for Romney. 10:44 p.m. EST: Obama has closed Romney's lead a bit; they're at 49 percent and 50 percent, respectively, per Fox. ... 9:16 p.m. EST: Romney leads 54 percent to 45 percent, with 42 percent of precincts reporting, per CNN. Romney is up by about 138,000 votes. ... 8:39 p.m. EST: Voting in Virginia could continue until 11 p.m., per CNN. ... 8:34 p.m. EST: Romney continues to lead Obama here 56-42, says CNN, and he's holding onto gains over McCain's tally in 2008. 24% of the vote is in right now. ... 7:50 p.m. EST: Good news for Obama: CNN notes that in "battleground" Henrico County, VA, Obama's numbers so far are tracking very close to where they were in 2008. He won the county, and the state, for the first time of any Democrat since LBJ in 1964 ... 7 p.m. EST: With the first precincts reporting, Obama and Romney are tied at 49 percent to 49 percent ... 5:17 p.m. EST: The Virginia Times-Dispatch is reporting that Virginia may have seen higher turnout this year than in 2008, according to State Board of Elections Secretary Don Palmer. ... 5 p.m. EST: Virginia's 13 electoral votes went to Obama in 2008 by a comfortable six-point margin, but it's not clear whether he'll be able to pull off the trick again in a state that -- until his election -- hadn't gone to a Democrat in a presidential race since 1964. Polls close here at 7 p.m.




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12:40 EST: The state remains in play, now at 50 percent for Obama, 49 percent for Romney. 10:09 p.m. EST: A lot of Florida's most conservative counties have reported 100 percent of their votes now, and Obama still holds a narrow lead, with a 40,000 vote advantage over Romney, and 86 percent of the vote in. CNN notes that Romney is doing slightly better in the state than McCain did in 2008, but it looks like it may not be enough. ... 9:20 p.m. EST: CNN says 300 votes separate Obama and Romney in Florida, with 78 percent reporting. But heavily Democratic counties Broward and Miami-Dade have had very few precincts report so far, and that will favor Obama's total. ... 9:13 p.m. EST: A 50-50 split right now. Romney leads by less than 1,500 votes. ... 8:46 p.m. EST: Obama is up 51 to 49 in Florida, with nearly 59 percent of the vote in, but a lot of critical counties have yet to fully report. The president is close to matching his 2008 tallies in the state's major population centers. ... 8:09 p.m.Obama's holding the lead 51 percent to 49 percent, with 42 percent of the vote in ... 7:45 p.m. EST: With 28 percent of the vote counted, Obama is holding the lead with 51 percent of the vote to Romney's 48 percent ... 7:36 p.m. EST: In Palm Beach County, the very earliest results have Obama ahead 66 percent to 34 percent, better than he did in 2008 by several points ... 7:11 p.m. EST: With 4 percent of the vote in, 55 percent of votes are for Obama and 45 percent for Romney. Still very early in the night there, given the long lines ... 5 p.m. EST: Florida is the biggest prize of all of the swing states, offering its winner 29 electoral votes. The outcome may heavily depend on turnout in Miami. Beware of the time: polls close in much of the state at 7 p.m., but voting in the state's panhandle doesn't conclude until 8 p.m. Back in 2000, news outlets infamously called the state before many voters had finished casting their ballots.



NORTH CAROLINA

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12:40 EST: With 98 percent of precincts reporting, the state has been called for Romney. The challenger has garnered 51 percent, while the president garnered 48. 9:59 p.m. EST: With 81 percent of the vote in, Romney is up 51 percent to Obama's 48 percent, with a solid lead of over 100,000. ... 8:29 p.m. EST: Romney is holding North Carolina with a slim margin right now. MSNBC says that, with 36 percent of precincts reporting, he leads by a bit less than 50,000 votes. ... 7:32 p.m. EST: Polls are closed. Early results show a 49 percent to 49 percent split ... 5 p.m. EST: Obama won North Carolina and its 15 electoral votes in 2008 by a margin of just 0.4 percent. Polls close here at 7:30 p.m.





OHIO

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1:12 a.m. EST: The state has been called for Obama with 88 percent of precincts reporting. ... 12:40 EST: With 84 percent of precincts reporting, the state is still too close to call. The president is at 50 percent of the vote, while Romney stands almost tied with him at 49 percent. 10:43 p.m. EST: Ohio: 58 percent reporting. Obama leads, 50-48. ... 9:52 p.m. EST: With 42 percent reporting, Obama is ahead at 52 percent. ... 8:49 p.m. EST: With 22 percent reporting in Ohio, Obama's up 57 to 41. ... 8:02 p.m. EST: First Ohio county to go blue, Mahoning, with 70 percent to Obama ... 7:35 p.m. EST: Exit polls are unreliable, so here's the party affiliation breakdown: 38 percent Democratic, 31 percent Republican ... 7:19 p.m. EST: Romney's final internal poll had him down by five here ... 5 p.m. EST: FiveThirtyEight gives Ohio 49.8 percent odds of deciding the election with one of its 18 electoral votes. Obama's up by 3.8 points in its adjusted polling average, while RealClearPolitics has him up by 2.9. In 2008, Obama took the state by a margin of 4.6 points. Polls close at 7:30 p.m. Eastern.




NEW HAMPSHIRE

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11 p.m. EST: Calling it for New Hampshire are The New York Times, AP, ABC, CBS, NBC, CNN, Fox. ... 9:36 p.m. EST: CBS has called New Hampshire for Obama. 8:06 p.m. With 7 percent reporting, Obama is ahead with 62 percent of the vote ... 5 p.m. EST: President Obama won New Hampshire's four electoral votes in 2008 by a wide margin. RealClearPolitics' polling average has the president up here by 2 points. FiveThirtyEight projects that he'll win by a margin of 3.5 points when the polls close at 8 p.m. Eastern.




COLORADO

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12:40 EST: With 66 percent of precincts reporting, the state has been called for the president. The president stands at 50 percent; Romney stands at 47. 10:52 p.m. EST: With 65 percent reporting, Obama enjoys a four-point lead over Romney, 51-47. ... 9:27 p.m. EST: In must-win Jefferson County (which has 326,000 votes at stake), Obama is up at 51 percent. ... 9:04 p.m. EST: Exit polls -- caveats apply -- in Colorado have the race tied at 48 percent to 48 percent ... 5 p.m. EST: Going into the final hours of the race, RealClearPolitics puts Obama ahead by 1.5 points, and FiveThirtyEight's adjusted average ups his lead by an extra point. In 2008, Obama won the state's nine electoral votes by nine points; polls close at 9 p.m. Eastern.





WISCONSIN

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12:40 EST: With 79 percent of precincts reporting, the state has been called for the president. Obama has 52 percent of the vote; Romney has 47. 11:04 p.m. EST: Obama pulls ahead. It's 50-49 percent for the President, with 74 percent of precincts reporting. ... 10:46 p.m. EST: Romney ahead by 3 percentage points in Wisconsin, with 55 percent reporting, according to the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. ... 9:42 p.m. EST: Fox and NBC have both called Wisconsin for Obama. 5 p.m. EST: With 10 electoral votes, GOP vice presidential candidate Paul Ryan's home state falls into both Real Clear Politics' and FiveThirtyEight's "toss-up" categories. Polls close at 9 p.m. Eastern.




IOWA

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12:40 EST: The state has been called for the president: 52 percent for Obama, 47 percent for Romney. 11:01 p.m. EST: 56 percent for Obama, 43 for Romney with 39 percent reporting. ... 10:35 p.m. EST: Iowa is "too early to call" -- 59 to 40 percent for Obama, according to CNN. ... 5 p.m. EST: Iowa's six electoral votes could swing either way, according to Real Clear Politics and FiveThirtyEight. Obama carried the state in 2008, but Romney's aggressive campaigning in Iowa has made the state a bigger challenge for the president. Polls close here at 10 p.m. Eastern.




NEVADA

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12:40 EST: The state went for the president, 52 percent to 46 percent. 11:09 p.m. EST: Nevada is 64-34 in Obama's favor with 1 percent reporting; 3,700 votes ahead, says CNN. ... 10:48 p.m. EST: Anjeanette Damon, senior politics editor for the Las Vegas Sun, tweets that NV exit poll results are still updating; Latino vote now up to 19 percent. Obama leads 69-24 percent. ... 10:03 p.m. EST: Nevada polls just closed. Unofficial exit polls show Obama slightly ahead, 51-45. ... 5 p.m. EST: Support for President Obama has waned in six-vote Nevada since 2008, when Obama carried the state. Now, Real Clear Politics lists Nevada as a "toss-up" state -- but FiveThirtyEight shows Obama with a slight lead, perhaps as a result of a late appeal to Latino voters. Polls close at 10 p.m. Eastern.

VIRGINIA

FLORIDA

Presented by

Brian Fung is the technology writer at National Journal. He was previously an associate editor at The Atlantic and has written for Foreign Policy and The Washington Post.

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