Occupy Wall Street's Raucous Birthday Party: Arrests, Sermons, and Signs

Police and protestors clash as the populist movement tries to reclaim its momentum with an anniversary rally in Manhattan.

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All photos by Julie Dermansky

Monday marked Occupy Wall Street's one-year anniversary. A day of protests to mark the milestone began with a 7 a.m. meet-up to try to shut down Wall Street and ended with more than 180 arrests, mostly for disorderly conduct and blocking pedestrian traffic.

Wall Street continued to function, but there was no business as usual in the Financial District. Police barricades closed off all entrances to the New York Stock Exchange. Anyone hoping to enter an exclusion zone around it had to produce ID and prove they lived, worked, or had business to do there. At times, police seemed to outnumber protesters, and some arrests during the protest seemed random: An officer would point out an individual in the crowd, and then a group would rush in and grab the target. JThe National Press Association said six journalists were among those arrested.

Despite the arrests, the day had a celebratory feel. At Bowling Green, the activist known as Reverend Billy led his Church of Life After Shopping choir in a Stevie Wonder-inspired rendition of "Happy Birthday." They may have fallen from the leadines, but Occupy protesters have kept their creative edge and optimism.

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Inside Zuccotti Park
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Protestor Barry Knight stands inside Zuccotti Park, which was barricaded.
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Joan Pleume, a member of Grannies for Peace said she remained optimistic about the Occupy movement.
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A bloodied protestor
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Police arrest a man wearing a Mitt Romney mask.
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Occupug Wall Street member Olivia
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After protestors retreated from Wall Street to the nearby Bowling Green, an activist known as "Rev. Billy" led a group in singing "Happy Birthday."
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Wes Trexler, who was being arrested for the sixth time in a year, goes limp to make it harder for police to remove him.
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A protestor visiting from Los Angeles
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Protestors try to storm Wall Street
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An elaborate costume played off the Batman villain Bane and the private-equity company Bain Capital.
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Julie Dermansky is a multimedia reporter and artist based in New Orleans. She is an affiliate scholar at Rutgers University's Center for the Study of Genocide and Human Rights. Visit her website at www.jsdart.com.

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