Jumping Off the Romney Ship: Pawlenty Resigns His Campaign Role

Thumbnail image for pawlenty.jpg
Reuters

Former Minnesota governor Tim Pawlenty, previously a GOP presidential and vice-presidential hopeful, has jumped ship and resigned as co-chairman of Mitt Romney's presidential campaign. 

Romney's team issued a statement incorrectly stating that Pawlenty would take over as chairman and CEO of the Financial Services Roundtable

Pawlenty will actually become president and CEO of the organization, succeeding former Dallas Mayor and Member of Congress Steve Bartlett, who has been serving as president of the Financial Services Roundtable since 1999.  Allstate CEO Thomas Wilson is the chairman of the Roundtable.

But one wonders whether Pawlenty, who has been on everyone's very short list for a likely high level cabinet post in a Romney White House, has just given up on Romney. Clearly a lot of other Republicans are on edge.  Rich Lowry's surprising blast at the GOP candidate is a case in point.

I asked a seasoned insider closely following the day to day operations of Team Romney:

Are people surprised by Pawlenty's move 48 days before the election?

Answer:

Well, let me put it this way - it's a great job for T-Paw, but not a better job than a cabinet secretary. If Romney were running five points ahead in the polls I doubt Pawlenty would've jumped ship.

There it is. Congratulations to Tim Pawlenty on FSR. Probably a smart move, and as good a political indicator as any of Obama/Romney trends.

Presented by

Steve Clemons is Washington editor at large for The Atlantic and editor of Atlantic Live. He writes frequently about politics and foreign affairs. More

Clemons is a senior fellow and the founder of the American Strategy Program at the New America Foundation, a centrist think tank in Washington, D.C., where he previously served as executive vice president. He writes and speaks frequently about the D.C. political scene, foreign policy, and national security issues, as well as domestic and global economic-policy challenges.

What Happened to the Milky Way?

Light pollution has taken away our ability to see the stars. Can we save the night sky?

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register with Disqus.

Please note that The Atlantic's account system is separate from our commenting system. To log in or register with The Atlantic, use the Sign In button at the top of every page.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

What Happened to the Milky Way?

Light pollution has taken away our ability to see the stars. Can we save the night sky?

Video

The Faces of #BlackLivesMatter

Scenes from a recent protest in New York City

Video

Desegregated, Yet Unequal

A short documentary about the legacy of Boston busing

Video

Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Life

The Supreme Court justice talks gender equality and marriage.

Video

Social Media: The Video Game

What if the validation of your peers could "level up" your life?

Video

The Pentagon's $1.5 Trillion Mistake

The F-35 fighter jet was supposed to do everything. Instead, it can barely do anything.

More in Politics

Just In