Picture of the Day: Romney's Bizarre 2002 Olympics Pins

First, he saved the Salt Lake City Games. Then he commissioned souvenirs to remind everyone he'd done so.

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ABC News

Politics has always been the province of egotists. But have Americans ever been treated to such a contest of comically self-absorbed presidential candidates? Via Chris Good and Andrew Kaczynski, it turns out that Mitt Romney had an entire series of pins issued to commemorate the 2002 Olympic Games Mitt Romney's role in the 2002 Olympic Games. In addition to the many items bearing his likeness, there's also this "Mitt happens" pin, which really boggles the mind. As Barack Obama might have told him, you didn't build that -- or even compete in it.

Meanwhile, the president is taking personalized fundraising to ever more absurd levels. For example, here's the first line of today's cash plea, which bears the overly familiar subject line, "Hey." Why should you give to Obama? Not health care, taxes, or financial reform. It's a personal milestone:

My upcoming birthday next week could be the last one I celebrate as President of the United States, but that's not up to me -- it's up to you.

These emails, like Obama, are getting old. Is it August yet?

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David A. Graham is a staff writer at The Atlantic, where he covers political and global news. He previously reported for Newsweek, The Wall Street Journal, and The National.

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