Romney's Odd Reference to Hitler

More

Michael Crowley of Time says Mitt Romney faces a Catch 22: Be "scripted and fake" or "natural and weird". This, says Crowley, is the "eternal question for the non-gifted pol"--either come across as a robot or risk "tripping over your own klutzy feet."

I used to think Romney's klutziness was overstated. His much-ridiculed musing about how the trees in Michigan are "the right height"--struck me as a kind of earthily poetic way of saying that home always feels like home. But then three weeks ago BuzzFeed dug up a clip of Romney answering a question about energy policy and managing to drag Hitler in from left field:

Of course, there's nothing really wrong with this. To speak favorably about the energy policy of history's greatest monster isn't to deny he was history's greatest monster. Still, among the many don'ts that should be second nature to a first-rate politician is, "Don't say anything about Hitler that will let BuzzFeed go with the not-technically-inaccurate headline, 'One Thing Hitler Did Right, According to Mitt Romney.' " You know the old saying: If you don't have something mean to say about Hitler, don't say anything at all.

I don't deny that, as an Obama supporter, I'm happy about Romney's periodic exhibitions of tone deafness. But I don't agree with Crowley--or with this Politico piece--that Obama has a big edge over Romney in this department. When Obama said, after the arrest of Harvard Professor Henry Louis Gates, Jr., that "the Cambridge police acted stupidly," he, too, showed a fairly shocking lack of conversancy with the politician's list of don'ts. Specifically: Don't ever render a negative judgment about police (or the military) unless an investigation has established undeniable wrongdoing (especially if you're a Democrat). And then there was Obama's bitterly-clinging-to-guns-and-religion riff. Though it came at an event that he thought was off the record, the fact remains that the judicious American politician (a) never says anything even implicitly negative about religion ever, anywhere; (b) realizes that in this day and age, whenever you're among more than a handful of people, you should assume you're being taped.

The truth is we have a race between two politicians who are generally capable but are both prone to the occasional epic lapse of judgment. This should be interesting.

Jump to comments
Presented by

Robert Wright is the author of, most recently, the New York Times bestseller The Evolution of God and a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. He is a former writer and editor at The Atlantic. More

Wright is also a fellow at the New America Foundation and editor in chief of Bloggingheads.tv. His other books include Nonzero, which was named a New York Times Book Review Notable Book in 2000 and included on Fortune magazine's list of the top 75 business books of all-time. Wright's best-selling book The Moral Animal was selected as one of the ten best books of 1994 by The New York Times Book Review.Wright has contributed to The Atlantic for more than 20 years. He has also contributed to a number of the country's other leading magazines and newspapers, including: The New Yorker, The New York Times Magazine, Foreign Policy, The New Republic, Time, and Slate, and the op-ed pages of The New York Times, The Washington Post, and The Financial Times. He is the recipient of a National Magazine Award for Essay and Criticism and his books have been translated into more than a dozen languages.

Get Today's Top Stories in Your Inbox (preview)

Why Are Americans So Bad at Saving Money?

The US is particularly miserable at putting aside money for the future. Should we blame our paychecks or our psychology?


Elsewhere on the web

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register. blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

The Death of Film

You'll never hear the whirring sound of a projector again.

Video

How to Hunt With Poison Darts

A Borneo hunter explains one of his tribe's oldest customs: the art of the blowpipe

Video

A Delightful, Pixar-Inspired Cartoon

An action figure and his reluctant sidekick trek across a kitchen in search of treasure.

Video

I Am an Undocumented Immigrant

"I look like a typical young American."

Video

Why Did I Study Physics?

Using hand-drawn cartoons to explain an academic passion

Writers

Up
Down

More in Politics

Just In