Video of the Day: Joe Coors Is Not a Beer

A Colorado congressional hopeful insists he's neither a career politician nor a refreshing alcoholic beverage.

Having a famous name can be an asset in politics. But with voters accustomed to frequent television ads hawking Coors beer, how could Joe Coors make people notice spots supporting his run for Congress?

Here's his entertaining answer to that conundrum. Coors is running the ad in Colorado's 7th district, where he's trying to unseat Democratic Rep. Ed Perlmutter (last seen in this space being dubiously compared to Mahmoud Ahmadinejad).

Part of the joke is that Coors is from the brewing family that produces the Silver Bullet, although his career has largely been in ceramics. He's not the first member of his family to try for elected office in Colorado as a Republican: His younger brother Pete lost a 2004 race for Senate to Democrat Ken Salazar. Democrats have jokingly "conceded" that Joe Coors is not, in fact, a beer, but Time's Michael Scherer -- in a nod to Christine O'Donnell's infamous 2010 ad -- has a theory about Coors involving a more sinister brew than the banquet beer:

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David A. Graham is a senior associate editor at The Atlantic, where he oversees the Politics Channel. He previously reported for Newsweek, The Wall Street Journal, and The National.

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