Video of the Day: Ron Paul for President, the Video Game

In this Super Mario Brothers-style game, players collect delegates and gold coins (of course) en route to the presidency.

If caucuses, debates, and a blimp won't do the trick for you, there's always one final electoral ploy available: gaming.

Daniel Williams, a developer who helped create RonPaulSwag.com, has taken to Kickstarter, the site that allows creative projects to crowdsource their funding, to solicit funds. Williams says of Ron Paul Swag, "For the last year or so, my partners and I have been dedicating ourselves to making liberty sexy." Evidently, they've given up and headed in the opposite direction: old-school video games.

We kid, we kid (seriously, back away from the send button on that angry email, Paul fans). The game actually looks pretty awesome. It's done up in the style of Super Mario Brothers, but with cooler music, a little Ron Paul character instead of Mario, and what appear to be George W. Bush heads instead of koopa troopas. The game will have 50 levels, plus 13 boss fights, one for each of the branch of the Federal Reserve. The gold coins stay the same, obviously, although the player also collects delegates on the way to the White House.

Williams' Kickstarter was successful in raising the $5,000, although he's still collecting additional funds, so it's hoped his game -- which he says will be free -- is available soon. Once launched, it will surely be the gold standard in political video games.

Presented by

David A. Graham is a senior associate editor at The Atlantic, where he oversees the Politics Channel. He previously reported for Newsweek, The Wall Street Journal, and The National.

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