Video of the Day: Obama Slow-Jams ... the Stump Speech?

Barack Obama, Jimmy Fallon, and the Roots fuse babymaking music and student-loan politics.

And here it is, the much-anticipated clip of President Obama slow-jamming the news with Jimmy Fallon Tuesday night. Or really, slow-jamming the stump speech: Obama basically runs through his student-targeted stump spiel on Stafford Loans, while Fallon and the Roots' Tariq Trotter moan out some slick R&B phrases. Particular winners: "He's the POTUS with the mostest;" "he's the preezy of the United Steezy;" and "the Barackness Monster." Better still: "The GOP is steady saying no, no, no/They should find something new to do like Tim Tebow." Impressively, Obama manages to keep a straight face even when Trotter, a.ka. Black Thought, says "the right and left should join on this like Kim and Kanye" -- a reference to the rapper Obama has described as a "jackass."

It's also required watching if you've ever wanted to hear "Hail to the Chief" turned into a sultry, sleazy, late-night club anthem. And who hasn't?

Presented by

David A. Graham is a senior associate editor at The Atlantic, where he oversees the Politics Channel. He previously reported for Newsweek, The Wall Street Journal, and The National.

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