Marco Rubio's Vice Presidential Freudian Slip

Though he says he won't be a running mate, the Florida senator says he'll have the chance to do much if he does "a good job as vice president."

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Liz Lynch / National Journal

Forida Sen. Marco Rubio said Wednesday that "I don't want to be the vice president right now, or maybe ever. I really want to do a good job in the Senate." He said he'd say no even if presumptive Republican nominee Mitt Romney asked him.

But in an interview at an event kicking off the University of Phoenix/National Journal Next America project, Rubio also demonstrated that the vice presidency is on his mind. "If in four to five years, if I do a good job as vice president--I'm sorry, as senator--I'll have the chance to do all sorts of things," he said.

The Next America project is examining how demography shapes the national agenda.

Read the full story about Rubio's appearance at the University of Phoenix/National Journal's Next America forum, including his comments on Arizona's controversial immigration bill.

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