GSA Executives Forced to Resign Over $800,000 Conference

An office dedicated to streamlining the work of government is caught throwing a lavish Las Vegas party.

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GSA Chief Martha Johnson was forced to resign Monday. Getty Images

Martha Johnson, chief of the General Services Administration, and two of her top executives resigned Monday. You probably would too if you spent over $800,000 of taxpayer dollars on an extravagant "conference" off of the Las Vegas Strip. If you don't know the General Services Administration (GSA) was created to, in their words, "streamline the administrative work of the federal government" and it "oversees the business of the U.S. federal government." Somehow, Johnson and her crew parlayed those tenets into a "regional meeting" in Henderson, Nevada (having the discretion to not be at a hotel on The Strip -- that's a modicum of modesty right?).

Thanks to an investigation and report from GSA Inspector General Brian D. Miller, The Washington Post, and the Associated Press, we now know how Johnson and her team spent all that money.

Read the full story at The Atlantic Wire.

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