Supreme Court Health-Care Oral Arguments: The Transcripts

Oral arguments before the Supreme Court over the Affordable Care Act have now ended. Read the full transcripts here.

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Reuters

Day One: In the first round of arguments, lawyers for both the plaintiffs and the government argued that even though provisions of the law haven't taken effect yet, the plaintiffs have standing to bring the law and the Court has standing to rule on it. Robert Long, an outside lawyer and experienced Supreme Court advocate, was asked to argue that it was too soon to judge the law. Justices did not appear sympathetic to his case. Click here for audio.

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Day Two: During the second round, the justices heard arguments over whether the individual mandate, which forces citizens to either purchase insurance or pay a fine, is constitutional. The general consensus is that plaintiffs' lawyer Paul Clement delivered a dazzling performance, while Solicitor General Donald Verrilli, arguing on behalf of the law, struggled and faced skeptical questioning from the bench. Click here for audio.

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Day Three: On the final day of oral arguments, the main topic of discussion was severability, i.e., whether the law is able to stand if the mandate is struck down, or if its elimination renders the rest of the law invalid. The government has argued that the act can't function without the mandate. Justices appeared divided on the question. Click here for audio.

Day 3 Morning Transcript of the Supreme Court Health Care Hearing

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