Video of the Day: Ron Paul's Theme Song

More

The unorthodox Texan has adopted an anthem by a singer who claims the CIA tried to suppress her debut record for inciting revolution.

Here are some tunes to enliven a chilly mid-February afternoon. This song, "Revolution," by singer Aimee Allen, celebrates Rep. Ron Paul's run for president, and Paul has adopted it as pump-up music before speeches and stump appearances.

The video itself is a thing to behold -- a grimy, industrial, dystopian aesthetic that is something like George Orwell meets the Wachowski Brothers, or perhaps the Girl With the Dragon Tattoo joins the John Birch Society. And it's not just standard End-the-Fed rhetoric: there's even a reference to the Bilderberg Group. In a nod to the Paul's largely male support, there are some scantily clad women cavorting, just for kicks.

Allen has an interesting story. The song isn't new -- it actually got some attention on MTV in 2002. Allen was signed to Elektra, and "Revolution" was to be one of the songs on her debut record, I'd Start a Revolution (If I Could Get Up in the Morning). What happened next is a matter of debate. She claims Elektra refused to release the record because the CIA objected to her use of the term revolution, but it also refused to spring her from her contract. In 2004, however, Warner shut down Elektra, incorporated it into Atlantic Records (no relation to the magazine), and culled its roster; Allen was among those cut.

Paul's adoption of her song as his theme makes her a libertarian counterpart to Krista Branch, the Tea Party siren whose "I Am America" became Herman Cain's anthem; like Allen, Branch has a compelling back story. Allen is from California, Branch is from Oklahoma, which seem like good geographic stand-ins for the respective movements. (Branch's song is catchier than Allen's, but Allen's video is far more entertaining.)

Jump to comments
Presented by

David A. Graham

David Graham is a senior associate editor at The Atlantic, where he oversees the Politics Channel. He previously reported for Newsweek, The Wall Street Journal, and The National.

Get Today's Top Stories in Your Inbox (preview)

Sad Desk Lunch: Is This How You Want to Die?

How to avoid working through lunch, and diseases related to social isolation.


Elsewhere on the web

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register. blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Where Time Comes From

The clocks that coordinate your cellphone, GPS, and more

Video

Computer Vision Syndrome and You

Save your eyes. Take breaks.

Video

What Happens in 60 Seconds

Quantifying human activity around the world

Writers

Up
Down

More in Politics

Just In