Video of the Day: Newt Gingrich's Mitt Romney Blooper Reel

Romney may look invincible, but his angry rival is unleashing a barrage of attacks on him just a day after the New Hampshire primary.

Mitt Romney may look invincible in his quest for the Republican nomination, but someone forgot to tell Newt Gingrich -- or actually, he wasn't listening. Within hours of getting trounced in the New Hampshire primary, where he slid to fourth despite the endorsement of the state's largest paper, the former speaker came out swinging Wednesday. He sent a fierce email to subscribers of National Review, the conservative standard bearer; released King of Bain, the half-hour special documentary that takes Romney to task as a corporate raider; and dropped this web ad, which is essentially a blooper reel of Romney's most cringe-inducing comments.

The list includes his "corporations are people, my friend" quote; his "I like being able to fire people" remark; and his "I'm running for office, for pete's sake!" interjection, among others. It closes out by reminding voters of the incident in which Romney strapped the family dog to the roof for a long drive. It's funny. But does it make any strategic sense? The explicit premise of the ad is that the most important trait in a GOP nominee is the ability to win debates against President Obama, which is almost certainly false. Moreover, it seems curious that someone with Gingrich's checkered record would recommend digging too deep into candidates' pasts.

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David A. Graham is a staff writer at The Atlantic, where he covers political and global news. He previously reported for Newsweek, The Wall Street Journal, and The National.

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