Video of the Day: Gabrielle Giffords' Goodbye

In a powerful video message, the wounded Arizona politician thanks her supporters and bids them farewell -- for now.

Just over one year after she was shot and badly wounded in Tucson, Rep. Gabrielle Giffords said on Sunday that she's stepping down from Congress this week to focus on her recovery. She made the announcement in a brief video, addressing constituents. The whole video is powerful, featuring the congresswoman addressing the camera, with scenes from her recovery and her emotional appearance on the House floor last fall. But perhaps the most poignant moment is hearing Giffords -- whose recovery has been described as miraculous, but whose speech remains halting -- thanking Arizonans for "the trust you put in me to be your voice." And she promises we haven't seen the last of her: "I will return and we will work together for Arizona and this great country."

A special election will be held to fill her seat. Over at The Atlantic Wire, John Hudson has a good rundown of the political implications of Giffords' resignation.

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David A. Graham is a staff writer at The Atlantic, where he covers political and global news. He previously reported for Newsweek, The Wall Street Journal, and The National.

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