Voicemail: Abramoff Asks DCCC to Stop Squatting on JackAbramoff.com

Jack Abramoff has done his time, and now he wants the Democratic Party to stop using his name. Last week, Abramoff called the party to say so -- very politely.

The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, the party's fundraising arm for House elections, registered JackAbramoff.com in 2006, according to a DCCC spokesman. Apparently having realized this, Abramoff left a voicemail message with the DCCC last week, asking if he could talk to someone about the site name.

Today, the DCCC's Abramoff site went live -- and it includes an audio recording of Abramoff's voicemail message. Here's a transcript:

Hi--I'm told that you're the head of I.T. at the DCCC, and I was wondering if you could please call me back. It involves a website that's registered to the DCCC that's actually in my name, and I wanted to discuss with you guys whether I could wind up amicably figuring it out with you getting it back, so I didn't know whether you were the right person or not, but in any event if you could call me back I'd appreciate it. My name is Jack Abramoff, I'm at [recording goes silent, skipping Abramoff's phone number], and I'd be very grateful for a call back in any event, even if I have the wrong guy, just so maybe I can figure out who I should talk to. Thanks so much, bye-bye.

The site promises that "We Didn't Forget, Jack" and asks visitors to sign an online petition to "Tell Jack Abramoff that we remember his role in the Republican Culture of Corruption and will work to defeat ethically-challenged Republicans in 2012."

Speaking to media in an apparent attempt at making amends in the process of promoting his new book, Capitol Punishment, Abramoff recently discussed the nature and process of congressional corruption in a "60 Minutes" interview with Lesley Stahl.

Presented by

Chris Good is a political reporter for ABC News. He was previously an associate editor at The Atlantic and a reporter for The Hill.

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