Protesters Occupy Mitch McConnell's D.C. Office

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Protesters occupied Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell's office on Thursday, a notably partisan move that aligns the protesters more closely with congressional Democrats who say McConnell is a key roadblock to action on economic legislation President Obama has proposed.

The protest took place as the Senate was set to vote on the latest piece of Obama's jobs agenda, a $60 infrastructure spending bill, along with an alternative GOP surface transportation bill. Both were expected to be defeated on mostly party line votes.

An estimated 10-20 protesters entered McConnell's personal office in the Russell Senate Office Building. McConnell primarily uses a separate office in the Senate. McConnell aides and Capitol Police officers said the protesters were respectful and not confrontational. They were from the group Our DC, which advocates for the unemployed, and were demanding an audience with the Republican leader.

A McConnell spokesman said the group was offered a meeting with staff, which protesters declined. They were given water and chairs, he added.

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Dan Friedman is a staff writer (Senate leadership) for National Journal.

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