The Occupy Wall Street TV Ad Could Actually Air on TV

A San-Franciso-based advertising start-up is helping to raise money for air time to promote the protest movement

Last week, we wrote about Occupy Wall Street's commercial, which features a montage of protesters explaining what they would like to get out of the movement.

Since then, we've been contacted by the commercial 's director, David Sauvage. He told us that the commercial was on track to air nationally, thanks to the efforts of a San Francisco-based digital advertising start-up called LoudSauce.

So now, millions of Americans that are upset at Wall Street will get a polished look at the protesters, and find out how they can donate to Occupy Wall Street.

LoudSauce was started founded by Christie George and Colin Mutchler as a simple way for people to push ideas out by crowd-sourcing funds for large-scale advertising. Mutchler said they don't stand for any particular kind of politics, just "the right of citizens to use their channels of advertising...and promote ideas they care about."

Here's how it works:

A given campaign will begin with a funding goal and a time limit. If the funding goal is not met within the time limit, none of the contributors get charged.

But if the goal is met in time, LoudSauce proceeds with a media buy.

Occupy Wall Street started its LoudSauce campaign last week with little fanfare and a goal set for $5,000. Thanks to mostly word of mouth (through Twitter and Facebook), the goal was met by Friday. They'll be wrapping up the campaign at the end of this week, and the commercial should be on TV in the next few weeks (they said most likely on ESPN). For LoudSauce, that means buying air time from Google TV ads. They''' give Google a set amount of money ($5,000 in this case) to be able to reach a set number of viewers (in this case, millions), as well as the specs for their commercial.

Google will then place the ad on television to fit LoudSauce's specifications, and based on the number of viewers it reaches. The commercial will run until its funding is exhausted. The thing with Google TV ads, is that they don't run on some cable providers like Comcast or Time Warner. But aside from that, the commercial could run on channels like ESPN, TNT, and CNN.

And according to Mutchler, if this works, it's just the beginning.

Presented by

Linette Lopez is a writer for Business Insider.

Why Principals Matter

Nadia Lopez didn't think anybody cared about her middle school. Then Humans of New York told her story to the Internet—and everything changed.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register with Disqus.

Please note that The Atlantic's account system is separate from our commenting system. To log in or register with The Atlantic, use the Sign In button at the top of every page.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

A History of Contraception

In the 16th century, men used linen condoms laced shut with ribbons.

Video

'A Music That Has No End'

In Spain, a flamenco guitarist hustles to make a modest living.

Video

What Fifty Shades Left Out

A straightforward guide to BDSM

More in Politics

Just In