Huntsman Threatens to Boycott Nevada, but He'd Probably Lose

Former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman was the first Republican presidential candidate to announce that he will boycott the Nevada caucuses if they're held to January 14, which would push the New Hampshire primary into December. That's because Huntsman has to do well in New Hampshire -- he's essentially running a one-state campaign right now. It's also because Huntsman will probably lose badly in Nevada. Other candidates who will likely lose there too soon followed Huntsman's lead -- Michele Bachmann, Rick Santorum, and Newt Gingrich, National Journal's Sarah B. Boxer reports. So Huntsman is taking it a step further. On Friday he announced he's boycotting next week's Republican primary debate, which is being held in Las Vegas, CNN's Mark Preston reports. Instead, he'll hold a "'First in the Nation' Town Hall" in New Hampshire. Very clever.

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