Representing a New Libya on K Street

Lobbying and PR firms in the U.S. are anxious to establish relationships with the rebels in Tripoli, as others try to distance themselves from Qaddafi

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Influence peddlers who once worked for Libyan leader Muammar el-Qaddafi's regime are scrambling to publicly sever ties with the strongman while their competitors are helping his country's rebels gain a valuable foothold in Washington.

After years spent working under the radar, public-affairs firm Brown Lloyd James and the consultancy Monitor Group this summer disclosed millions of dollars earned working on behalf of Qaddafi's government, according to disclosures filed retroactively with the Justice Department.

On the other side of the fight, Patton Boggs and the Harbour Group have signed on with the Libyan Transitional National Council, which the United States, Canada, Britain, Spain, and Germany now recognize as the country's legitimate government. Both firms worked to help the council gain that recognition after being retained this spring.

And the firms are giving Libya's new government a sweet deal on their services. Patton Boggs is charging the council by the hour with a $50,000 monthly cap and an agreement not to seek payment until the rebels have ample funds. The Harbour Group, meanwhile, is working pro bono. Of course, the discounts reflect a move by both companies to get in on the ground floor of what could be a long-term, multimillion-dollar relationship.

Ali Suleiman Aujali, the TNC ambassador to the United States, is working to get the transitional government access to roughly $35 billion of Qaddafi-related funds the United States froze after the uprising began.

David Tafuri, a partner at Patton Boggs, recently traveled to the rebel stronghold of Benghazi to plot strategy with transitional government leaders on how best to get some of that money unfrozen to address humanitarian needs and fund the political transition. Most of his efforts have primarily targeted Treasury and State department officials, Tafuri said, but he has also found bipartisan support on Capitol Hill.

Sens. John Kerry, D-Mass.; John McCain, R-Ariz.; Joe Lieberman, ID-Conn.; Tim Johnson, D-S.D.; and Marco Rubio, R-Fla., have backed releasing some of the money for humanitarian purposes; Johnson sponsored a bill to that effect, Tafuri said, but the legislation got lost in the furor over raising the debt ceiling. Now, the TNC is looking to the Obama administration to release the money through executive order or to have Treasury direct banks to release some of the funds to the rebels, he said.

Tafuri and the Harbour Group's Richard Mintz spent some of Monday shepherding Aujali between meetings with officials and interviews with journalists. Tafuri handles much of the legal and lobbying work, while Mintz does media and public relations. Aujali's team met with officials from the Treasury and State departments and did about a dozen interviews with English- and Arabic-speaking outlets.

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Chris Frates is a correspondent (lobbying) for National Journal.

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