Michele Bachmann, Jewish by 'Heritage'

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Irin Carmon reports on Bachmann's meaningful summer on a Negev kibbutz, which apparently helped shape part of her theology:

Years later, in a speech to AIPAC, Bachmann said of her time there, "We worked on the kibbutz from 4 am to noon. We were always accompanied by soldiers with machine guns. While we were working, the soldiers were walking around looking for land mines. I really learned a lot in Israel." She added, "I am a Christian, but I consider my heritage Jewish, because it is the foundation, the roots of my faith as a Christian."

I have deep worries about the negative ramifications of a certain type of Christian love for Israel (I wrote about this here), but it's always quite refreshing to hear a Christian embrace her religion's roots in Judaism, rather than deny those roots.

P.S. -- Apropos of nothing in particular, and not a well-known fact, but many random celebrities have spent time on Israeli kibbutzim, including my new favorite find, Simon Le Bon of Duran Duran.

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Jeffrey Goldberg is a national correspondent for The Atlantic and a recipient of the National Magazine Award for Reporting. Author of the book Prisoners: A Story of Friendship and Terror, Goldberg also writes the magazine's advice column. More

Before joining The Atlantic in 2007, Goldberg was a Middle East correspondent, and the Washington correspondent, for The New Yorker. Previously, he served as a correspondent for The New York Times Magazine and New York magazine. He has also written for the Jewish Daily Forward, and was a columnist for The Jerusalem Post.

His book Prisoners was hailed as one of the best books of 2006 by the Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Slate, The Progressive, Washingtonian magazine, and Playboy. Goldberg rthe recipient of the 2003 National Magazine Award for Reporting for his coverage of Islamic terrorism. He is also the winner of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists prize for best international investigative journalist; the Overseas Press Club award for best human-rights reporting; and the Abraham Cahan Prize in Journalism. He is also the recipient of 2005's Anti-Defamation League Daniel Pearl Prize.

In 2001, Goldberg was appointed the Syrkin Fellow in Letters of the Jerusalem Foundation, and in 2002 he became a public-policy scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C.

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