Still Leading From Behind

Obama's decision to campaign for a comprehensive budget solution is right, I think, but it came very late. His new posture conforms to the "leading from behind" model of his presidency to date. In the end, he advocates reasonable solutions capable of commanding sufficient support in the country--in this case, a "balanced" fiscal plan that mixes spending cuts with higher revenues--but he has to be dragged there, let alone led there. He gets to the right place reluctantly. It looks like defeat, so his advocacy is much less effective. Peggy Noonan says his intervention is a net negative. I disagree. It's a net positive, but not nearly as positive as an earlier forceful intervention could have been.

One day this week he explained why he had decided to back the Gang of Six proposal. What was new about it, he was asked? He said it was new because it was bipartisan: for the first time a plan was getting support from Democratic and Republican senators. What? The broad outline of the Gang of Six plan (which is all we have) is very familiar: it is Bowles-Simpson for slow learners. Democratic and Republican senators on the president's own fiscal commission all voted for a similar deficit reduction plan months ago. Where was the president back then?


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