After Weinergate, Members of Congress Tweet Less

After what happened to their fellow representative, members of Congress have adopted more conservative tweeting habits

Two weeks ago Rep. Anthony Weiner meant to DM a picture of his package to an interested lady. Instead, he tweeted it to all his followers. Oops. It's an understandable technical mistake, the sort of thing that could happen to even the most seasoned tweeters. Which is why it's not surprising that since Weinergate began, members of Congress have changed their tweeting habits and become even more cautious. According to TweetCongress, which aggregates congressional tweeting behaviors, congressmen (and women) tweeted about 30 percent less after Weiner's mishap than before. Reviewing tweeting from May 8 through June 9, TweetCongess found a notable lull in tweeting from members of Congress after May 27, the day Weinergate began. The stats, by party, are in the infographic below.

weinergate-effect.jpg


Drop-down image credit: TweetCongress.org

Presented by

Rebecca Greenfield is a former staff writer at The Wire.

Why Principals Matter

Nadia Lopez didn't think anybody cared about her middle school. Then Humans of New York told her story to the Internet—and everything changed.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register with Disqus.

Please note that The Atlantic's account system is separate from our commenting system. To log in or register with The Atlantic, use the Sign In button at the top of every page.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

A History of Contraception

In the 16th century, men used linen condoms laced shut with ribbons.

Video

'A Music That Has No End'

In Spain, a flamenco guitarist hustles to make a modest living.

Video

What Fifty Shades Left Out

A straightforward guide to BDSM

More in Politics

Just In