After Weinergate, Members of Congress Tweet Less

After what happened to their fellow representative, members of Congress have adopted more conservative tweeting habits

Two weeks ago Rep. Anthony Weiner meant to DM a picture of his package to an interested lady. Instead, he tweeted it to all his followers. Oops. It's an understandable technical mistake, the sort of thing that could happen to even the most seasoned tweeters. Which is why it's not surprising that since Weinergate began, members of Congress have changed their tweeting habits and become even more cautious. According to TweetCongress, which aggregates congressional tweeting behaviors, congressmen (and women) tweeted about 30 percent less after Weiner's mishap than before. Reviewing tweeting from May 8 through June 9, TweetCongess found a notable lull in tweeting from members of Congress after May 27, the day Weinergate began. The stats, by party, are in the infographic below.

weinergate-effect.jpg


Drop-down image credit: TweetCongress.org

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Rebecca Greenfield is a former staff writer at The Wire.

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