The Political Genius of 'Celebrity Wife Swap'

My first thought when forwarded this article announcing a new ABC show called "Celebrity Wife Swap" was that somebody was playing an elaborate practical joke on me, and a pretty funny one. Astute readers will recall my item (and accompanying chart) last week revealing that the audience for Donald Trump's NBC show, "Celebrity Apprentice," is by far the most liberal on primetime television, which adds a frisson of extra idiocy to Trump's already idiotic undertaking. Readers may also recall my subsequent item, pointing out that the same audience-demographic data shows that the second-most-liberal show on television is "Wife Swap." So you can understand my initial skepticism--what sort of warped TV executive would create such a Frankenstein's monster of slavering lowbrow liberal viewership as "Celebrity Wife Swap"?


Upon reflection, of course, the answer is "any one of them." The folks at ABC just got there first. I checked in with some of my ratings-and-demographic sources to see what they made of the news. One thought proffered to me was that ABC is cleverly targeting NBC's viewers: After all, why watch that moron Trump shout at celebrities when you can see them swapping wives instead? Makes sense. But the more obvious, and compelling, suggestion was that the show would brilliantly isolate, and thus let advertisers target, a purely liberal audience. Imagine the fortune ABC will reap! Advertisers--certain ones, anyway--will be falling all over themselves to reach this lefty audience. Can you imagine the ads that will bombard viewers? I can: Subaru Forresters, vibrators, anything involving Tina Fey...
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Joshua Green is a former senior editor at The Atlantic.

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