Picture of the Day: Quentin Roosevelt's Playpal

More

Quentin Roosevelt and his playmate Roswell Newcomb Pinckney, 1902

frances_johnston-07.jpg
Every now and then, it's nice to take a break from the onslaught of current events to take a historic tour. Perusing White House images of yore, we found this 1902 photograph of Theodore Roosevelt's youngest, Quentin, hanging out with a playpal Roswell Newcomb Pinckney, son of White House steward Henry Pinckney, during the first year of Roosevelt's presidency. Only three years old when his dad took office, Quentin spent his childhood in the White House. The image was snapped by Frances Benjamin Johnson.

Years after this shot, Quentin would enlist in the army and fight as a pursuit pilot in World War I. He was eventually killed in an aerial combat over France in 1918. There's nothing on the Google, alas, about who Pinckney grew up to be.

Image: Library of Congress

Jump to comments
Presented by

Rebecca Greenfield is a writer based in Brooklyn. She was formerly on staff at The Atlantic Wire.

Get Today's Top Stories in Your Inbox (preview)

Is Technology Shifting Our Moral Compass?

"The experience of taking another human life becomes much more trivial."


Elsewhere on the web

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register. blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Juice Cleanses: The Worst Diet

A doctor tries the ever-popular Master Cleanse. Sort of.

Video

Why Did I Study Physics?

Using hand-drawn cartoons to explain an academic passion

Video

What If Emoji Lived Among Us?

A whimsical ad imagines what life would be like if emoji were real.

Video

Living Alone on a Sailboat

"If you think I'm a dirtbag, then you don't understand the lifestyle."

Feature

The Future of Iced Coffee

Are artisan businesses like Blue Bottle doomed to fail when they go mainstream?

Writers

Up
Down

More in Politics

Just In