Picture of the Day: Quentin Roosevelt's Playpal

Quentin Roosevelt and his playmate Roswell Newcomb Pinckney, 1902

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Every now and then, it's nice to take a break from the onslaught of current events to take a historic tour. Perusing White House images of yore, we found this 1902 photograph of Theodore Roosevelt's youngest, Quentin, hanging out with a playpal Roswell Newcomb Pinckney, son of White House steward Henry Pinckney, during the first year of Roosevelt's presidency. Only three years old when his dad took office, Quentin spent his childhood in the White House. The image was snapped by Frances Benjamin Johnson.

Years after this shot, Quentin would enlist in the army and fight as a pursuit pilot in World War I. He was eventually killed in an aerial combat over France in 1918. There's nothing on the Google, alas, about who Pinckney grew up to be.

Image: Library of Congress

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Rebecca Greenfield is a former staff writer at The Wire.

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