Palin's Political Epitaph

Thanks to the 150K+ of you who yesterday read my June Atlantic piece, "The Tragedy of Sarah Palin," and the 750 or so who took the time to add a comment (I haven't gotten to them yet, but assume they're all positive--right?). I'll have more on Palin and other subjects later today, including a bizarre Trump item. But in the meantime, I wanted to highlight this John Podhoretz piece in Commentary that offers what I think is the best political epitaph for Palin:

In some ways, the story of Palin is a story of temptation. Rather than sticking to her guns and deepening her political credentials and her knowledge base, she embraced her celebrity instead. And in doing so, she didn't defeat her critics and enemies; she capitulated to them. Listen, it's her life and her fortune and she is free to do what she wishes with it. And there's no telling what the future holds for anyone in America. But she had and has more raw political talent than anyone I've ever seen, and, alas, as phenoms go, it looks like she is headed for a Darryl Strawberry-like playing career.
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Joshua Green is a former senior editor at The Atlantic.

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