Congress Goes After PlayStation

More

After Sony's PlayStation Network got hacked, losing millions of credit card numbers, Congress is investigating the data breach and Sony's response to it.

Rep. Mary Bono Mack (R-Calif.) convened a hearing of her Subcommittee on Commerce, Manufacturing and Trade in the House Energy and Commerce Committee on Wednesday, and had asked Sony to testify in Washington.

Sony declined to send a representative, instead submitting an eight-page letter responding to the subcommittee's 13 written questions, which sought to ascertain how the breach happened, how many credit card numbers were lifted, who was responsible, and whether Sony responded appropriately.

"Sony now faces a large-scale cyber-attack involving the theft of personal information. This cyber-attack came shortly after Sony Computer Entertainment America was the subject of denial of service attacks launched against several Sony companies and threats made against both Sony and its executives in retaliation for enforcing intellectual properaty rights in U.S. Federal Court," wrote Kazuo Hirai, chairman of the board of directors for Sony Computer Entertainment America in his letter to the subcommittee:

050411Hirai

Bono Mack intends to ask Sony, once again, to testify before the committee, according to a senior staffer.

"They missed a great opportunity to be at the hearing, and not only to explain what happened, but also to explain why ... new safety procedures were not in place already," said Ken Johnson, a longtime committee staffer and senior adviser to Bono Mack.

Bono Mack is drafting a data-security bill, seeking to implement standards for protecting this kind of information, and Johnson said Sony's massive data breach has affected the drafting of the bill. As the bill moves forward, Johnson predicted Bono Mack would follow up with Sony in writing and, permitting enough time for another hearing, ask the company once again to appear in person.

"Aside from declining to testify personally, Sony has been cooperating with us," Johnson said. "If they take a pass a second time around, my suggestion to them is: duck."

If the subcommittee doesn't get the answers it wants from Sony, Johnson said Bono Mack is open to issuing a subpoena.

Jump to comments
Presented by

Chris Good is a political reporter for ABC News. He was previously an associate editor at The Atlantic and a reporter for The Hill.

Get Today's Top Stories in Your Inbox (preview)

What Do You See When You Look in the Mirror?

In a series of candid video interviews, women talk about self-image, self-judgement, and what it means to love their bodies


Elsewhere on the web

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register. blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Adventures in Legal Weed

Colorado is now well into its first year as the first state to legalize recreational marijuana. How's it going? James Hamblin visits Aspen.

Video

What Makes a Story Great?

The storytellers behind House of CardsandThis American Life reflect on the creative process.

Video

Tracing Sriracha's Origin to Thailand

Ever wonder how the wildly popular hot sauce got its name? It all started in Si Racha.

Video

Where Confiscated Wildlife Ends Up

A government facility outside of Denver houses more than a million products of the illegal wildlife trade, from tigers and bears to bald eagles.

Video

Is Wine Healthy?

James Hamblin prepares to impress his date with knowledge about the health benefits of wine.

Video

The World's Largest Balloon Festival

Nine days, more than 700 balloons, and a whole lot of hot air

Writers

Up
Down

More in Politics

Just In