The Big Winners of the Budget Deal

Friday's budget deal wasn't all about cutting: As with every government-funding bill, some agencies and programs will get more money this time around.

Amid the $38.5 billion in cuts (see the biggest cuts here), House appropriators have increased funding to budget areas that generally tend to grow each year, according to details on discretionary spending released by House Appropriations Committee Republicans.

Here are some winners of the budget deal -- the federal agencies and programs that will receive more discretionary funds in 2011, compared to 2010:

  • The Defense Department will receive $5 billion more this year than last, with an added $157.8 billion allocated to emergency/contingency funding, to be used in military operations overseas.
  • The deal will also fund the National Nuclear Security Administration at $697 million, a seven percent increase over 2010 appropriations.
  • The Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP) inspector general's office will get $13 million more than last year. Republicans, particularly those who oppose the financial bailout, have stressed oversight of TARP funds.
  • The Department of Veterans Affairs will receive $13.8 billion more in 2011. This funding is offset by a decrease in military construction spending; lumped together, the two areas see only a $3.4 billion increase.
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Chris Good is a political reporter for ABC News. He was previously an associate editor at The Atlantic and a reporter for The Hill.

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