Choose Your Own Budget Adventure!

You pass the deal, and business resumes.

A few dozen conservative Republicans vote against you, but with the support of moderate Democrats, the bill passes.89.png

The federal government continues to operate.

Tea partiers and your conservative colleagues grumble about the deal. They accuse you of selling them out, and question your commitment to deficit reduction, but there is no full-on revolt.

You tell them that a compromise was inevitable, you took the best deal you could, and you made headway with the White House, building a consensus that more cuts still need to be made.

They're not happy, but they accept that this is how business works.

The crisis is over, and you go back to work as Speaker of the House.

Presented by

Chris Good and Alex Hoyt

Chris Good is an associate editor and online politics writer for The Atlantic. Alex Hoyt does story research for The Atlantic and illustrations for TheAtlantic.com.

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