Netflix Bets on a Political Thriller

I'd heard the news earlier that Netflix was jumping into the TV business by producing and airing its own show. But only just now, when I read the Times write-up, did I learn that the show they're producing (in 26 episodes) is the terrific political thriller, "House of Cards," based on the novel Michael Dobbs. As a political reporter, I am, naturally, a fan of the genre. And my favorite political-thriller miniseries of all time just happens to be the BBC's 1990 production of "House of Cards," in which the actor Ian Richardson wonderfully portrays the murderous, malevolent, stop-at-nothing Prime Minister hopeful, Francis Urquhart*. If you haven't seen it already, you can get it on Netflix right now (the BBC one, that is). Hurry! Here's the opening:




P.S. I realize that's not exactly a Michael Bay trailer--but just trust me on this
*I'd mistakenly written "Bryan," whoever that is

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Joshua Green is a former senior editor at The Atlantic.

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