More Signs of a Hispanic Boom

The U.S. Census Bureau has released more state-level demographic data from the 2010 Census, and with the latest batch of states come more signs of a Hispanic boom.

The bureau is releasing state-level data gradually over February and March. In the latest five states, released this week, the Hispanic population grew both in percent of the state's total population and in raw numbers:

  • Illinois: 15.8 percent (2,027,578), up from 12.3 percent (1,530,262) in 2000
  • Oklahoma: 8.9 percent (332,007), up from 5.2 percent (1,79,304) in 2000
  • South Dakota: 2.7 percent (22,119), up from 1.4 percent (10,903) in 2000
  • Texas: 37.6 percent (9,460,921), up from 32 percent (6,669,666) in 2000
  • Virginia: 7.9 percent (631,825), up from 4.7 percent (329,540) in 2000

The growth was significant, though perhaps not as dramatic as we saw in the first states the bureau released. See those Hispanic population shifts below:

  • Arkansas: 6.4 percent (186,050), up from 3.2 percent (2,586,534) in 2000
  • Indiana: 6 percent (389,707), up from 3.5 percent (214,536) in 2000
  • Iowa: 5 percent (151,544), up from 2.8 percent (82,473) in 2000
  • Louisiana: 4.2 percent (192,560), up from 2.4 percent (77,083) in 2000
  • Maryland: 8.2 percent (470,632), up from 4.3 percent (227,916) in 2000
  • Mississippi: 2.7 percent (81,481), up from 1.4 percent (39,569) in 2000
  • New Jersey: 17.7 percent (1,555,144), up from 13.3 percent (1,117,191) in 2000
  • Vermont: 1.5 percent (9,208), up from .9 percent (5,504) in 2000

As argued in the previous post, the nation's growing Hispanic population could be the political macrostory of the next fifty years. Hispanics typically vote Democratic--67 percent for Obama according to CNN exit polls in 2008, solidly Democratic again in key races in the 2010 midterms--and Hispanic population growth could benefit Democrats in national and statewide elections. It could also, perhaps, change the political calculus on issues like immigration, where hardliners have won elections by employing heated rhetoric that alienates Hispanic votes.

All data taken from the Census Bureau's online database.


Presented by

Chris Good is a political reporter for ABC News. He was previously an associate editor at The Atlantic and a reporter for The Hill.

A New York City Minute, Frozen in Time

This wildly inventive short film takes you on a whirling, spinning tour of the Big Apple

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register with Disqus.

Please note that The Atlantic's account system is separate from our commenting system. To log in or register with The Atlantic, use the Sign In button at the top of every page.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

A New York City Minute, Frozen in Time

This short film takes you on a whirling tour of the Big Apple

Video

What Happened to the Milky Way?

Light pollution has taken away our ability to see the stars. Can we save the night sky?

Video

The Faces of #BlackLivesMatter

Scenes from a recent protest in New York City

Video

Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Life

The Supreme Court justice talks gender equality and marriage.

Video

The Pentagon's $1.5 Trillion Mistake

The F-35 fighter jet was supposed to do everything. Instead, it can barely do anything.

More in Politics

Just In