No More Sides at the State of the Union?

More

Sen. Mark Udall, D-Colo., is hoping for a literal demonstration of bipartisanship to combat a political dialogue that, he says, "has become more hateful and at times violent." He wants members of Congress to tear down the invisible wall in the House of Representatives chamber and sit side by side, Democrats next to Republicans, during the State of the Union.

Udall proposed the idea -- originally the brainchild of moderate think tank Third Way -- in a "Dear Colleague" letter to the Senate that he also sent to the House and Senate leadership.

"Beyond custom, there is no rule or reason on this night we should emphasize divided government, separated by party, instead of being seen united as a country," Udall wrote. "The choreographed standing and clapping of one side of the room -- while the other side sits -- is unbecoming of a serious institution. And the message that it sends is that even on a night when the president is addressing the entire nation, we in Congress cannot sit as one, but must be divided as two."

Obama's past addresses to a joint session of Congress -- this will be his fourth -- have seen partisan friction. During Obama's first State of the Union, Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito was seen mouthing "not true" when Obama criticized the high court's ruling in Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission. And during the president's speech about health care reform in September 2009, Rep. Joe Wilson, R-S.C., famously yelled "You lie!" at Obama.

Udall said he hopes such a seating arrangement will "begin to rekindle the common spark that brought us here from 50 different states and widely diverging backgrounds to serve the public good."

Third Way -- whose honorary co-chairs include the likes of Udall, Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., Rep. Jane Harman, D-Calif., and notably, the wounded Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, D-Ariz. -- proposed the idea in a letter to congressional leadership on Monday. They also proposed two other ideas to promote bipartisanship: off-the-record bipartisan retreats and setting aside funds for members to travel to the district or state of someone from the other party.

"They will not mend our economy or win a war," Third Way President Jonathan Cowan wrote, "but they can help you make some progress in restoring a sense of common purpose in the institution you lead."

Jump to comments
Presented by

Rebecca Kaplan is a staff writer (White House) for National Journal.

Get Today's Top Stories in Your Inbox (preview)

What Is a City?

Cities are like nothing else on Earth.


Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register. blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

CrossFit Versus Yoga: Choose a Side

How a workout becomes a social identity

Video

Is Technology Making Us Better Storytellers?

The minds behind House of Cards and The Moth weigh in.

Video

A Short Film That Skewers Hollywood

A studio executive concocts an animated blockbuster. Who cares about the story?

Video

In Online Dating, Everyone's a Little Bit Racist

The co-founder of OKCupid shares findings from his analysis of millions of users' data.

Video

What Is a Sandwich?

We're overthinking sandwiches, so you don't have to.

Video

Let's Talk About Not Smoking

Why does smoking maintain its allure? James Hamblin seeks the wisdom of a cool person.

Writers

Up
Down

More in Politics

Just In