Doctors Noncommittal on Giffords Fully Regaining Faculties

While the doctors say they are optimistic Rep. Gabrielle Giffords will survive Saturday's shooting, they were noncommittal in an interview with MSNBC Monday afternoon about the chances that she will fully regain her faculties.

"Well I think that that is rare and obviously I think in most situations [a bullet shot through the head is] not a good prognosis, but if you're gonna have a good prognosis, this is about as good as it's gonna get," said Dr. Peter Rhee, medical director of UMC, told MSNBC's Chris Matthews.

We'll know more about Giffords's recovery progress in about two weeks, Rhee said.

"Examples are out there for very functional recoveries and everything in between," said Dr. Michael Lemole, neurosurgeon at University Medical Center in Tucson, where Giffords is being treated.

Lemole pointed as an example to Bob Woodruff, the ABC reporter who suffered a traumatic brain injury from a roadside bomb while reporting in Iraq. Woodruff returned to the air just 13 months after his injury.

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Chris Good is a political reporter for ABC News. He was previously an associate editor at The Atlantic and a reporter for The Hill.

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