The Missing WikiLeaks Debate

Peter Beinart's take on the latest WikiLeaks stash seems about right to me: no significant surprises, no great scandals (apart from the fact that the leak was not prevented in the first place), all very interesting in a voyeuristic sort of way--but how, he asks, are diplomats supposed to do their job if they are denied confidential communication with HQ? As Timothy Garton Ash says:

There is a public interest in understanding how the world works and what is done in our name. There is a public interest in the confidential conduct of foreign policy. The two public interests conflict.

Yes, but whose job is it to resolve this conflict? Do we really want to put Julian Assange in charge? The New York Times, the Guardian and the other WikiLeaks collaborators say they have taken care to ensure that nobody has been put at risk by the selections they have published--but they have certainly not condemned Assange's activities, and indeed that would be an awkward thing for them to do, given their role in facilitating them. Assange, obviously, is not interested in balancing the two interests. He is not releasing secrets judiciously, arguing that the benefits outweigh the harm in each specific case. The whole point is that he is releasing documents by the hundreds of thousands--indiscriminately, for which the only rationale can be that the very idea of official secrecy is wrong.

I'm not saying that this view is completely indefensible, only that among those who look kindly on the wikileaks project somebody, surely, ought to be trying to defend it. Assange isn't going to. He seems to regard the evil of official secrecy as a simple truth requiring no further comment. The wikileaks promoters disagree: they appear to recognize the dilemma. But they feel under no obligation to say more. They are capitalizing on the sheer scale of the leaks--which is what, more than any specific disclosure, has caused their notoriety--yet spare themselves the inconvenience of discussing the very question which the size of the leaks immediately raises. And they are sanctimonious about it, too.

Presented by

How to Cook Spaghetti Squash (and Why)

Cooking for yourself is one of the surest ways to eat well. Bestselling author Mark Bittman teaches James Hamblin the recipe that everyone is Googling.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

How to Cook Spaghetti Squash (and Why)

Cooking for yourself is one of the surest ways to eat well.

Video

Before Tinder, a Tree

Looking for your soulmate? Write a letter to the "Bridegroom's Oak" in Germany.

Video

The Health Benefits of Going Outside

People spend too much time indoors. One solution: ecotherapy.

Video

Where High Tech Meets the 1950s

Why did Green Bank, West Virginia, ban wireless signals? For science.

Video

Yes, Quidditch Is Real

How J.K. Rowling's magical sport spread from Hogwarts to college campuses

Video

Would You Live in a Treehouse?

A treehouse can be an ideal office space, vacation rental, and way of reconnecting with your youth.

More in Politics

Just In