The Team of Rivals Ticket

While the White House is busy denying an Obama-Clinton 2012 ticket, it's worth revisiting the old rivals' 2008 primary map and considering where a joint ticket might actually gain traction. 

Clinton's comparative advantage over Obama is with women, working-class whites, and Hispanics. Adding her to the ticket would be a move aimed at strengthening Obama's prospects in Virginia and in eastern Big Ten Country -- Michigan, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. All of these states hinge on moms and working-class whites. 

Hispanics are the wild card. The Obama Administration hasn't done much to advance immigration reform, and this is probably a zero-sum game in the short-run. It's possible that Clinton might be able to shore up Hispanic support in Florida, Colorado, and Nevada. 

The Obama camp can kiss North Carolina and Indiana goodbye, states it won ironically thanks to fierce primary battles. The president won many moderate Republicans in those two states and in Virginia, but he's not going to hold them in 2012, and there's nothing Clinton or Obama can do about that. 

The map below from MyDD isn't a perfect indicator of where Clinton would boost Obama, but it's a good one. Ultimately, adding Clinton to the ticket would probably serve more as a shot in the arm to the Democratic base than as an appeal to win back "soft" 2008 votes.

  2008 Democratic Primary Electoral Map
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Patrick Ottenhoff has been writing The Electoral Map blog since 2007. A former staff writer for National Journal Group and project manager at New Media Strategies, he now attends Georgetown's McDonough School of Business. More

Patrick Ottenhoff attends Georgetown McDonough School of Business in the Class of 2012. He previously served as a project manager in the Public Affairs Practice of New Media Strategies and was a staff writer for National Journal Group. Patrick has been writing The Electoral Map blog since 2007. As the name implies, the blog covers news and commentary at the intersection of politics and geography, but it also analyzes the stories, people, culture, sports, and food behind the maps and the votes. Patrick is a native Virginian and graduate of Union College in New York. You can follow The Electoral Map on Twitter and Facebook, and follow Patrick on YouTube.

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