Pamela Geller, Clinical Paranoid

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You must read the transcript of the interview the Times conducted with Pamela Geller. She's a wildly prejudiced person. She makes me resent the Internet; no Internet, no Pamela Geller:

"...I also believe that a true translation, an accurate translation of the Koran, is really not available in English, according to many of the Islamic scholars that I've spoken to. That's deeply troubling. And I don't think that many westernized Muslims know when they pray five times a day that they're cursing Christians and Jews five times a day. I don't think they know that."

Names, please, of the Muslim scholars who say there has not been an accurate translation made of the Koran. I've never heard this assertion before, and I've heard many assertions made about Islam. In re: the matter of cursing Christians and Jews, could this be projection on her part? She spends her entire day cursing Muslims. Then there's this:

PAMELA GELLER: ...Oh, I believe in the idea of a moderate Muslim. I do not believe in the idea of a moderate Islam.

ANNE BARNARD What would be a moderate Muslim then?

PAMELA GELLER I think a moderate Muslim is a secular Muslim.

Geller is a stunning ignoramus. Substitute the word "Jew" for Muslim and see how ridiculous her assertion sounds. There are hundreds of ways for a Muslim to practice Islam. These ways range from Takfiri extremism to Sufi moderation. It's hard to imagine that she has ever met a practicing Muslim, or that she has stepped into a mosque.

Now here is Geller on the "mosque-ing" of the American workplace, the slow imposition of Muslim law on America, and on her grand conspiracy theory:

... I guess there's conspiracy theory and there's conspiracy fact. And clearly the global jihad, the installation of a universal caliphate, is the objective of a great many Islamic supremacists who make no secret of it.

A Martian takeover of New Jersey is more likely than the imposition of a caliphate, or of Muslim law, on America, for any number of reasons, including: One percent of America's population is Muslim; within this one percent, a vanishingly small minority believes in the ideology of al-Qaeda, which propogates the idea of the restoration of the caliphate; a much greater percentage of American Muslims believes in interfaith dialogue (I know this from personal experience, having been invited to countless interfaith dialogue groups). Only a true paranoid could look at America as it is today and see the creeping takeover of Islamist caliphate ideology.

America has a problem with Islamism, absolutely. The way to win the war against Islamist extremism is to isolate the fundamentalists from the main streams of Islam. Pamela Geller, on the other hand, would radicalize moderate Muslims. In short, she is the kind of person who gives counterterrorism a bad name.

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Jeffrey Goldberg is a national correspondent for The Atlantic and a recipient of the National Magazine Award for Reporting. He is the author of Prisoners: A Story of Friendship and Terror. More

Before joining The Atlantic in 2007, Goldberg was a Middle East correspondent, and the Washington correspondent, for The New Yorker. He was previouslly a correspondent for The New York Times Magazine and New York magazine. He has also written for the Jewish Daily Forward and was a columnist for The Jerusalem Post.

Goldberg's book Prisoners was hailed as one of the best books of 2006 by the Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Slate, The Progressive, Washingtonian magazine, and Playboy. He received the 2003 National Magazine Award for Reporting for his coverage of Islamic terrorism and the 2005 Anti-Defamation League Daniel Pearl Prize. He is also the winner of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists prize for best international investigative journalist; the Overseas Press Club award for best human-rights reporting; and the Abraham Cahan Prize in Journalism.

In 2001, Goldberg was appointed the Syrkin Fellow in Letters of the Jerusalem Foundation, and in 2002 he became a public-policy scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C.

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