Kevin Drum asks, in reference to my questions about historical revisionism in the South (questions prompted by Haley Barbour) if the Germans are unique in the way in which they have confronted their sins:

For what it's worth, I'd say Germany is the exception, not the rule, here. Most countries with sins in their past have mixed feelings about it, from French veneration of Napoleon to the longstanding Turkish insistence that no genocide of Armenians ever took place to the Japanese supernationalists who have long baited their politicians to visit Yasukuni Shrine every year. I suspect the almost unanimous German condemnation of the Hitler era is fairly unique in history, partly due to the sheer intensity of its evil and partly due to the fact that it was so short-lived. Unlike the other examples, it was never around long enough to become associated with an enduring cultural or nationalist tradition.

But guess what? Things can change even where enduring cultural and nationalist traditions are at work. Just a few months ago, Japanese prime minister Naoto Kan announced his decision not to visit the Yasukuni shrine on the anniversary of the end of World War II this year. Ditto for the rest of his cabinet. "As Class-A war criminals are enshrined there," he said, "an official visit by the prime minister or cabinet members is problematic. I have no plans to make a visit during my tenure." He seems to have survived this decision just fine. Maybe Haley Barbour should take note.