Map of the Day: Southern Democrats in Better Shape Than Northerners

Fewer politicians are less popular in the South than San Francisco's Nancy Pelosi, and so it was no surprise that the Speaker has given a pass to southern Democrats who have openly criticized her to their constituents. "I just want them to win," she told Judy Woodruff. "They know their districts."


Indeed, many southern Democrats are in a much better position to get reelected than their northern counterparts. When their colleagues from Ohio and Pennsylvania supported Pelosi and Obama's agenda, many southern Democrats did not -- and today's polls reflect that. 

I took a sample of six southern Democrats and six northern Democrats and found that the southerners were on average up in the polls by 13 points and the northerners were down by 11. 

This is an unscientific study, so I hope it doesn't end up getting picked apart on 538, but these numbers are clear: 
 
- Dan Boren (Oklahoma-02) +34
- Mike Ross (Arkansas-04) +18 
- Jim Marshall (Georgia-08) +12 
- Travis Childers (Mississippi-01) +7 
- Gene Taylor (Mississippi-04) +4 
- Lincoln Davis (Tennessee-04) +4

- Chris Carney (Pennsylvania-10) -4 
- Mary Jo Kilroy (Ohio-15) -5
- Carol Shea-Porter (New Hampshire-01) -10 
- Steve Driehaus (Ohio-01) -12 
- Patrick Murphy (Pennsylvania-08) -14 
- John Boccieri (Ohio-16) -14 

Bill Clinton won by focusing on the economy and kitchen table issues. Nancy Pelosi, aside from election-year posturing, championed legislation like cap-and-trade. It's no wonder that Democrats running against her are winning. 

This great map from Jay Cost at RCP shows how red the South has gotten in the last 12 years. Southern Vote for President, 1996-2008
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Patrick Ottenhoff has been writing The Electoral Map blog since 2007. A former staff writer for National Journal Group and project manager at New Media Strategies, he now attends Georgetown's McDonough School of Business. More

Patrick Ottenhoff attends Georgetown McDonough School of Business in the Class of 2012. He previously served as a project manager in the Public Affairs Practice of New Media Strategies and was a staff writer for National Journal Group. Patrick has been writing The Electoral Map blog since 2007. As the name implies, the blog covers news and commentary at the intersection of politics and geography, but it also analyzes the stories, people, culture, sports, and food behind the maps and the votes. Patrick is a native Virginian and graduate of Union College in New York. You can follow The Electoral Map on Twitter and Facebook, and follow Patrick on YouTube.

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