Bloomberg for Treasury? Don't Bet On It

Page Six rumports (rumor-reports) today that White House officials are sounding out New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg to succeed Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner, assuming that Geithner, ah, steps down, or is ousted somehow after the projected Democratic midterm bloodbath.


A White House official flatly denies this is the case, and a Bloomberg spokesman said that "the President didn't float anything, and the Mayor hasn't had a boss  in almost 30 years. He has zero interest in Treasury and is one of Geithner's biggest supporters."

Hasn't had a boss in 30 years?

What about the people of New York City?

(I kid... but ... do I?)

Also: the notion that the White House want to replace one Wall Street titan with another, especially if they're concerned with economic optics post mid-term, is a little foolish.
Presented by

Marc Ambinder is an Atlantic contributing editor. He is also a senior contributor at Defense One, a contributing editor at GQ, and a regular contributor at The Week.

Why Principals Matter

Nadia Lopez didn't think anybody cared about her middle school. Then Humans of New York told her story to the Internet—and everything changed.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register with Disqus.

Please note that The Atlantic's account system is separate from our commenting system. To log in or register with The Atlantic, use the Sign In button at the top of every page.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

A History of Contraception

In the 16th century, men used linen condoms laced shut with ribbons.

Video

'A Music That Has No End'

In Spain, a flamenco guitarist hustles to make a modest living.

Video

What Fifty Shades Left Out

A straightforward guide to BDSM

More in Politics

Just In