The New Criticism of Kagan: She Loves Sharia Law

Elena Kagan's nomination has been mostly void of controversy and criticism, and C-SPAN confirmed yesterday that at least 60 senators will vote for her confirmation. But at the 11th hour, the Daily Caller's Caroline May picks up on a strain of complaint: that, as a Supreme Court justice, Kagan would champion Sharia Law:

Kagan's detractors point to her time as the dean of Harvard Law School as the primary demonstration of her approval of Sharia. Andrew McCarthy, a senior fellow at the National Review Institute, wrote in an article on The National Review's website that as Harvard Law School dean, Kagan  "became the champion of sharia."

Included in Kagan's offensives as dean, according to McCarthy, was condoning the acceptance of $20 million from Saudi prince Alwaleed bin Talal -- who blamed the attacks of 9/11 on American foreign policy -- to fund programs on Islam. She also spearheaded the "Islamic Finance Project," a program aimed at mainstreaming Sharia-compliant finance in America. And, as some point out, she awarded the Harvard Medal of Freedom to the chief justice of the Supreme Court of Pakistan, Iftikhar Chaudhry, who critics say is a promoter of Sharia.

Robert Spencer, the director of Jihad Watch, told The Daily Caller that Kagan would help advance Sharia law in America out of ignorance. "[Kagan] would knowingly and wittingly abet the advance of Sharia, but she wouldn't do it understanding anything about Sharia. She would do it out of her ignorance."

Read the full story at the Daily Caller.
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Chris Good is a political reporter for ABC News. He was previously an associate editor at The Atlantic and a reporter for The Hill.

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