On the President's Religion

Seth Lipsky, who has written an indispensable book on the Constitution, notes that the President's religion should be considered perhaps the most inappropriate subject of all for partisan political discussion:

":..(W)hat we haven't seen -- or, more importantly, heard from the president -- is reference to the constitutional point. The one qualification for public office under the United States that was flatly outlawed by the Founders of our country is a religious test. It is prohibited in main body of the Constitution, in Article VI. It requires that all senators and representatives, and all members of all the state legislatures, and all executive and judicial officers -- both of the federal and state governments -- must be bound over by an oath or affirmation to support the Constitution of the United States. Then it lays down the famous prohibition: ". . . no religious Test shall ever be required as a Qualification to any Office or public Trust under the United States."

Read the whole thing.

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Jeffrey Goldberg is a national correspondent for The Atlantic and a recipient of the National Magazine Award for Reporting. He is the author of Prisoners: A Story of Friendship and Terror. More

Before joining The Atlantic in 2007, Goldberg was a Middle East correspondent, and the Washington correspondent, for The New Yorker. He was previouslly a correspondent for The New York Times Magazine and New York magazine. He has also written for the Jewish Daily Forward and was a columnist for The Jerusalem Post.

Goldberg's book Prisoners was hailed as one of the best books of 2006 by the Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Slate, The Progressive, Washingtonian magazine, and Playboy. He received the 2003 National Magazine Award for Reporting for his coverage of Islamic terrorism and the 2005 Anti-Defamation League Daniel Pearl Prize. He is also the winner of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists prize for best international investigative journalist; the Overseas Press Club award for best human-rights reporting; and the Abraham Cahan Prize in Journalism.

In 2001, Goldberg was appointed the Syrkin Fellow in Letters of the Jerusalem Foundation, and in 2002 he became a public-policy scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C.

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