Most Don't Count on Social Security Benefits

This weekend will mark the 75th anniversary of Social Security, and while Democrats are pushing Social Security as a campaign issue in races across the country, hitting Republican candidates for supporting privatization or a phasing out of benefits, most respondents to a CNN/Opinion Research poll say they don't count on full benefits continuing in the future.


Retired respondents didn't think the program will be able to continue paying in full without cuts; non-retired respondents voiced some overwhelming pessimism, with 60% saying they don't think Social Security will be able to pay them "a benefit" when they retire.

From the national telephone survey released today:

Social security CNN retired respondents.jpg

And the non-retired respondents:

Social security CNN non-retired respondents.jpg
Social Security's $678 billion accounted for 19% of the federal budget in 2009, according to tables from the Office of Management and Budget.
Presented by

Chris Good is a political reporter for ABC News. He was previously an associate editor at The Atlantic and a reporter for The Hill.

Why Principals Matter

Nadia Lopez didn't think anybody cared about her middle school. Then Humans of New York told her story to the Internet—and everything changed.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register with Disqus.

Please note that The Atlantic's account system is separate from our commenting system. To log in or register with The Atlantic, use the Sign In button at the top of every page.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

A History of Contraception

In the 16th century, men used linen condoms laced shut with ribbons.

Video

'A Music That Has No End'

In Spain, a flamenco guitarist hustles to make a modest living.

Video

What Fifty Shades Left Out

A straightforward guide to BDSM

More in Politics

Just In