Most Don't Count on Social Security Benefits

More

This weekend will mark the 75th anniversary of Social Security, and while Democrats are pushing Social Security as a campaign issue in races across the country, hitting Republican candidates for supporting privatization or a phasing out of benefits, most respondents to a CNN/Opinion Research poll say they don't count on full benefits continuing in the future.


Retired respondents didn't think the program will be able to continue paying in full without cuts; non-retired respondents voiced some overwhelming pessimism, with 60% saying they don't think Social Security will be able to pay them "a benefit" when they retire.

From the national telephone survey released today:

Social security CNN retired respondents.jpg

And the non-retired respondents:

Social security CNN non-retired respondents.jpg
Social Security's $678 billion accounted for 19% of the federal budget in 2009, according to tables from the Office of Management and Budget.
Jump to comments
Presented by

Chris Good is a political reporter for ABC News. He was previously an associate editor at The Atlantic and a reporter for The Hill.

Get Today's Top Stories in Your Inbox (preview)

Saving Central: One High School's Struggle After Resegregation

Meet the students and staff at Tuscaloosa’s all-black Central High School in a short documentary film by Maisie Crow. 


Elsewhere on the web

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register. blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Where Time Comes From

The clocks that coordinate your cellphone, GPS, and more

Video

Computer Vision Syndrome and You

Save your eyes. Take breaks.

Video

What Happens in 60 Seconds

Quantifying human activity around the world

Writers

Up
Down

More in Politics

Just In