Grayson: This Is a Democratic District, Get Used to It

Alan Grayson, the firebrand newcomer to the Democratic congressional caucus, is facing his first re-election race now that Republican Dan Webster has emerged from the GOP primary. And Grayson wasted no time in going on the attack, telling WBDO radio:

"First of all, I don't care who I beat," said Grayson. "Secondly, this is a Democratic district. We better get used to it."

Grayson's central Florida district hasn't been Democratic for very long.

Grayson took over in 2008, beating Republican Ric Keller 52% to 48% amid the Obama wave. Before that, Keller had held the seat since 2000. Before Keller, it was held by Bill McCollum, the Republican who lost in last night's gubernatorial primary. The Cook Political Report rates it R+2.

Read the full story at WBDO.

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Chris Good is a political reporter for ABC News. He was previously an associate editor at The Atlantic and a reporter for The Hill.

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