Divorce Court: The 'Political Ambitions' Argument

The couple that owns the L.A. Dodgers is getting divorced, and politics is, apparently, part of it. The L.A. Times's Bill Shaikin reports:


Jamie McCourt wanted to "renege" on an agreement that made the Dodgers her husband's personal property because that would have limited her effectiveness to pursue potential runs for public office, perhaps for mayor of Los Angeles, governor of California or president of the United States.

"She realized she needed the Dodgers as her platform to accomplish this," Steve Susman, Frank MCourt's attorney, said in closing arguments in the couple's divorce trial Monday in Los Angeles Superior Court.

Jamie McCourt is the former CEO of the Dodgers organization, and Forbes blogger Caroline Howard sees her ambitions as a sign of the times, with a handful of female former CEOs running for high-profile office this election year:

The running for office argument, though, is a new one, and clearly reflects the drawing power of other female CEOs in the race this year: Carly Fiorina, former HP CEO and running on the Republican ticket for U.S. Senate in California, Meg Whitman, former CEO of eBay and the Republican candidate for California governor and Linda McMahon, WWE's former CEO and candidate for the GOP Connecticut U.S. Senate slot.

Another political wrinkle in this case: Jamie McCourt's lawyer is David Boies, the lead attorney for Al Gore's legal team in the Florida-recount Supreme Court case in 2000--and now a lead attorney in the federal Prop. 8 challenge--who reunited on Jamie McCourt's legal team with Mark Fabiani, another Gore lawyer in the Florida 2000 case and one half of the "Masters of Disaster" crisis communications team during the Clinton/Gore years that included Chris Lehane.
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Chris Good is a political reporter for ABC News. He was previously an associate editor at The Atlantic and a reporter for The Hill.

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