The Good Summarian

>Chris Cillizza's Morning Fix reports that Iowa Democrats have lost their significant voter registration advantage over Republicans -- a result of the Obama campaign -- officially returning Iowa to swing state status. The 100,000-vote edge Democrats achieved in the state after the 2008 election has now shrunk to a more standard 46,000.

Mike Allen's Playbook cites a Politico account of Obama's decision to use a recess appointment for Donald Berwick, who will run Medicare and Medicaid. Senate Republicans have attacked Berwick as a supporter of rationing health care.  

Ezra Klein's Wonkbook on Berwick's appointment:

Whatever you could say about Berwick, he's not got a reputation as a liberal. Or, for that matter, a conservative. Rather, he's known as a zealot and an entrepreneur when it comes to quality improvement ... A world in which the two parties treat all nominees as one more skirmish in their long war is a world in which the the best people will refuse nomination, and the government will be denied the talent it needs to carry out its most difficult tasks -- and that will be true both for traditionally liberal priorities like expanding access to health care and traditionally conservative priorities like reforming entitlements.

The Daily Beast's Cheat Sheet notes a New York Times story about the growing rift between Arizona and other border states. Arizona Governor Jan Brewer recently canceled a yearly meeting of U.S. and Mexican governors that was scheduled to take place in Phoenix. Other U.S. governors claim Brewer does not have the authority to cancel the meeting and plan to reschedule it in another city.

ABC's The Note links to a Politico article about a Tea Party-linked think tank run by Ginni Thomas, wife of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas. The group's two primary donors are secret, prompting questions as to how Justice Thomas would recuse himself from a case in which they were involved.

 


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Nicole Allan is a former senior editor at The Atlantic.

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