The Ever Sought-After Scott Brown

The New Republic's Noam Scheiber has a shrewd profile of Scott Brown, painting the Massachusetts senator as neither particularly smart nor overly sophisticated, but adept at setting Democrats and Republicans alike scrambling for his vote:

As the 41st Republican in an institution that requires 60 out of 100 votes to pass legislation, he's had the power to stop, or at least massively slow down, everything from health care to financial reform. But Brown actually looms much larger than even this calculus would suggest. In his concerns, priorities, and, maybe most important, his confusion about the economy, Brown has come to represent the average voter in 2010. If Democrats are going to be successful this November, they'll have to figure out a way to seize the territory that Brown currently holds.

Read the full story at The New Republic.

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Nicole Allan is a former senior editor at The Atlantic.

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