Sharron Angle: Stop Displaying My Views!

After winning her multi-way primary in Nevada's Senate race, Sharron Angle ditched her old website. She lost the "issues" page that talked about her desire to end the Department of Education and Social Security and her aims to roll back offshore drilling regulations, and, after an interim during which the site was basically a one-page fundraising ordeal, she reemerged with a slick new version that drastically re-cast those opinions, displaying a bit more political savvy (and consulting help) for her primetime fall campaign against Nevada Sen. Harry Reid, one of the most powerful people in the nation. Now, she's asked Reid to stop displaying the old version of her website online:

But Internet pages are rarely ever forgotten -- the Reid campaign saved the old version, and put up a website called "The Real Sharron Angle," reproducing the old content.

Then, they say, the Angle campaign sent them a cease-and-desist letter, claiming misuse of copyrighted materials in the reposting of the old website -- which was, of course, being posted for the purposes of ridiculing Angle. The Reid campaign has in fact taken down the site, rerouting visitors to another website that goes after Angle's positions, "Sharron's Underground Bunker."

Presented by

Chris Good is a political reporter for ABC News. He was previously an associate editor at The Atlantic and a reporter for The Hill.

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