Rob Simmons Awakens His Sleeper Candidacy

Rob Simmons made a show of dropping out of the Republican Senate primary in Connecticut a few weeks ago after the State Republican Party endorsed Linda McMahon, former CEO of World Wrestling Entertainment. But the former congressman had received enough votes at the party's convention that his name remained on the ballot, prompting speculation that he would resume his candidacy.

And lo and behold, he has. Simmons has released an ad reminding viewers that his name is still on the ballot. Eric Janney, his campaign manager, told the New York Times that as Simmons traveled around the state recently, "Many people did not realize that Rob remained on the ballot. So he decided to do a television ad that reminds people that they have a choice and that Rob is on the ballot."

McMahon's team, which was partnerining with the State Republican Party to attack Democratic frontrunner Richard Blumenthal, was less than pleased:

Her campaign immediately lashed out at Mr. Simmons, saying in a statement that the former congressman's "on-again-off-again campaign is a little like trying to keep up with an Abbott and Costello routine: Who's on first?"

Mr. Simmons's advertising campaign, which is to cost about $350,000, will start running an ad on television this weekend and will continue until the Republican primary election on Aug. 10, according to his campaign.

Read the full story at the New York Times.

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Nicole Allan is a former senior editor at The Atlantic.

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