Pew released a new midterm election survey today, finding Republican enthusiasm having hit a record high since it began such polling in the summer of 1994.


56% of Republicans say they are more enthusiastic about voting this year, vs. 42% of Democrats who say the same. That's the highest level Republicans have registered since October 1994, when GOP enthusiasm (on the same question) was at 45%.

It's not, however, a particularly bad year for Democratic enthusiasm: 42% is much higher than the 30% Democrats registered in 1994, and it's comparable to the 40% and 46% shown in June 2002 and June 2006, respectively.

According to Pew, we're likely to see more independent turnout in 2010 than in 1994 as well: 42% of independents are enthused right now, vs. 29% in 1994.

But the GOP enthusiasm advantage extends into a couple important subgroups: older Americans and GOP-leaning independents.  Voters over 50 years of age break 52%/41% for Republicans, and close to 80% say they are "absolutely certain to vote." Independents break 44%/36% for Republicans, and GOP leaners are more enthusiastic (55%) than Democratic leaners (36%).