Pelosi Doesn't Know Robert Gibbs, Doesn't Appreciate His Comments

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That's what House Speaker Nancy Pelosi had to say at a closed-door House Democratic Caucus meeting last night about White House Press Secretary Robert Gibbs and his comment Sunday on "Meet the Press" that "there's no doubt there are enough seats in play that could cause Republicans to gain control" of the House. Pelosi apparently has not met Gibbs (who has been downplaying/backtracking from the comment this week) and doesn't know who he is, CQ's Kathleen Hunter and Jennifer Bendery report:


Several Democratic sources in the room described a testy scenario that started with Rep. Bill Pascrell Jr. (N.J.) criticizing Gibbs for saying on NBC's "Meet the Press" that there is "no doubt there's enough seats in play" to allow for a House GOP takeover in 2012. Things heated up as Pelosi jumped in and blasted Gibbs for making "politically inept" comments, according to one source.
"It was bad," another source said. "She was like: 'I don't appreciate it. I don't know who this guy is. I've never met him before. And he's saying that we're going to lose the House.'"

Gibbs, in case you were wondering who he was before taking the podium in the White House press room, has been working in Democratic communications for some time: he was press secretary of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee in the 2002 election cycle after working for Sen. Max Cleland. He's worked for Obama since his 2004 Senate bid.

House Democrats, needless to say, do not appear to be happy with Gibbs, and perhaps rightly so: while the Senate confronts slim majorities and the White House grapples with that reality, House Democrats are the one arm of the party that has smoothly accomplished big-ticket items like cap-and-trade, financial reform, and health care ahead of everyone else, with some members taking tough votes to realize Obama's agenda.

Read the full story at CQ.
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Chris Good is a political reporter for ABC News. He was previously an associate editor at The Atlantic and a reporter for The Hill.

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