Map of the Day: Obama Approval Rating Drops in 49 States

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Dick Cheney and Barack Obama couldn't be further apart, and so it's no surprise that their home states of Wyoming and Hawaii gave the president the lowest and highest approval ratings, respectively, in the first half of 2010 as measured by Gallup.

Obama's approval rating dropped in both states from this point in 2009 -- albeit in Hawaii it fell to a still-strong 68 percent. The only state where his numbers rose in 2010 was Joe Biden's Delaware, from 61 percent in 2009 to 62 percent today.

To be sure, Obama's approval rating, which was 49 percent on average nationwide in the first half of 2010, wasn't all that bad. In fact, it's remarkably similar to Reagan's at an equal point in his presidency.

But a couple of states stand out, particularly economically libertarian New Hampshire.  Obama had a 54 percent approval rating there in 2009; today it is 41 percent, which is better than only nine Appalachian and Western states.

Arizona is also giving Obama below average marks, down from a solid 55 percent in 2009. This shift is surely a byproduct of the immigration fight.  And Indiana, a formerly Hoosier red state that Obama flipped in 2008, has also soured on the president.

The good news for the White House is that Colorado, Virginia, and most of the states in the Big Ten Conference are giving him marks on average with the rest of the nation. The bad news: Those marks aren't all that high.

Obama Approval Rating by State, 2010

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Patrick Ottenhoff has been writing The Electoral Map blog since 2007. A former staff writer for National Journal Group and project manager at New Media Strategies, he now attends Georgetown's McDonough School of Business. More

Patrick Ottenhoff attends Georgetown McDonough School of Business in the Class of 2012. He previously served as a project manager in the Public Affairs Practice of New Media Strategies and was a staff writer for National Journal Group. Patrick has been writing The Electoral Map blog since 2007. As the name implies, the blog covers news and commentary at the intersection of politics and geography, but it also analyzes the stories, people, culture, sports, and food behind the maps and the votes. Patrick is a native Virginian and graduate of Union College in New York. You can follow The Electoral Map on Twitter and Facebook, and follow Patrick on YouTube.
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